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I never chose my spiritual path, it chose me.

This is going to be slightly different from the posts I have made in the past.

This is about how I found my spiritual path.

From as far back as i can remember, I have had some beliefs set in stone- karma/Dharma and reincarnation being two of the main.

I was raised in the church, in a strict Christian home. No other religions were mentioned and I just held the belief that all people walked the same path. I went to church 3 times a week, played basketball at night after class and followed along. When I outgrew Bible class and started sitting through the sermons, I would read chapters of the Bibles lying around. I tried asking questions about things I had trouble believing with blind faith and was labeled a trouble maker.

I attended 3 different church camps over the summer and almost always ended up befriending the “troubled” more misfit types. Some of my friends were lesbians, some were sexually active, some were atheist and some practiced witchcraft.

I almost got kicked out of the main camp a few times and only went to see my friends I only got to see that one week.

I wasn’t a “bad” kid in the least, I stayed out of trouble and didn’t get into anything like drugs, smoking (until I was 18 and I still regret it) and graduated high school having never even dated anyone. I just questioned everything. I questioned the concept of the Christian God. I questioned what I read in the Bible, how there was only one true religion when all world religions seemed to have deities for the same symbols. I questioned everything but no one would talk to me. I eventually quit.

When I was in middle school, I got into a religious conversation with a classmate who told me he was an atheist. I asked what that was and when he told me he didn’t believe, it made a few prices come together- not every one followed that same path and that may have been why I felt so wrong. I tried to look into it but was stopped since other religions were not allowed to be discussed outside of “it’s wrong” and started reading books in the library at school. In 9th grade, I moved to a very religious area and tried coming out as an atheist. At that time, I was into alternate spirituality and starting to be more into seances and similar. I had previously owned an Ouija board but my mom threw it out because I played with it more than other stuff. I started drawing them and folding paper into triangles to use as a planchette. I used to use it daily, then I’d toss it out and doodle more. I also started trying to contact spirits and studied being a medium. I actually started with an interest in spiritual communications, as I call it, at the age of 7. My friend and I went into an attic and I held my first seance. It was a success and freaked us out. I had to put off studying due to my upbringing but I did try from time to time over the course of my childhood.

While a lot of kids played games like “house? with their friends, I was taking my friends on ghost hunts. While a lot of teenagers were reading magazines, I was secretly in the library reading all the occult, spirituality and haunting books I could get my hands on.

After graduation, when I went to college, I started openly searching. I studied but at that time was out as an agnostic. I looked at Hinduism, but having to believe in deities didn’t sit with me. I still firmly believe all religions are equally valid, but the gods are nothing more than symbols. I do believe in the soul, spirits, demonic type and angelic type beings and the ability to communicate.

Of course, when you’re open about believing in those things but not going to church every Sunday, you get labeled with just about every term people can think of- from crazy to demonic to possessed to satanic (hard to worship a deity you don’t believe in)

In college, I started hanging out with some Pagans and started taking an interest, pair that with the ability to actually study the stuff and I was finally able to start seeking my path.

During college, I met a man I used to go to school with and we reconnected. It was a horrific relationship, but in that time I was gifted my first set of Tarot cards, taught about paranormal investigations, I started practicing different forms of scrying and practicing the craft. In that time, I also took an at home Astrology and Divination course. I was introduced to more of the Pagan community and several websites including Witchvox. I was also introduced to the local craft shop and fell in love with the atmosphere. The community seemed so much more welcoming and it felt like I had found people who thought like me and were accepting.

That was 10 years ago, since then we have broke up (luckily) but I have carried on practicing and trying to learn. I may not practice as much and as often as I’d like but I still read tarot (but a deck that chose me- the original deck I was gifted had nothign but negative energy and gave horrible readings- then one day just randomly disappeared and I didn’t try too hard to find it.

I had had a series of dreams that my first born would be a daughter (it was) and she always was named after the moon goddess. When I met my husband and we got pregnant, our first was a little girl, so like the dreams I named her after the goddess.

She was born on the last night of the full moon, 3 months early. She was born extremely prematurely and was extremely sick. Despite her rough start, she is a strong little six year old now and due to the situation, I have come to call on the moon goddess.

 

I’ll be posting more on spirituality as well in later posts. This is just how I came to discover the path I should be walking down. (I’m still searching, learning and changing but I think we all continously evolve over our lives, especially with how we practice. )

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I introduced the EDS, This is about my life with OCD

As far back as I can remember, I struggled with everything needing to be perfect. My first memory related, was when I was in early elementary school. I had to have my work perfect. By perfect, I mean it had to look absolutely perfect- if I looped a “B,” I had to erase but if I left an eraser mark, it didn’t count and I would have to copy everything onto a new paper until there were no marks and no messy letters. To this day, people complement my handwriting. The ones I’m friends with, I’ll joke about why my handwriting is so neat, other times I’ll just thank them and move on.

Another strong memory I have from when I was in elementary school is being afraid of thinking anything profane on Sunday, after church while I still smelled like the church building. I was afraid if I let any impure thought slip, I would get struck by lightning. Needless to say, I slipped once and nothing happened. When nothing happened, I started to realize it was unfounded so that obsession slowly faded.

I also had a strong fear that if I slept with my feet uncovered, I would get drug into a Hell like dimension by a demon.I read a while back, that is actually a common fear.

When I was in later elementary school, the people I associated with outside of school were middle aged, most of whom had weight problems and were trying to lose weight. What started as me getting hooked on Diet Coke and diet specialty foods, walking and reading weight loss tips in women’s magazines turned into an obsession. Pretty soon, I had a set workout routine I HAD to follow or else, in my mind, I would gain 20lbs over night. It went from a short 5 minute workout to taking over an hour to do. It also grew from having to walk a few times a day to having to walk 12 miles, BUT the 12 miles had to be by myself, if I walked with anyone else, the calories were not burned and my count had to freeze. It also didn’t count without music, so if my walkman died in the middle of a lap, I had to redo the lap. It went from me getting anxious to punishing myself if I failed a day. I would restrict my calories as much as possible until I started having near fainting spells in 9th grade. I found out I had low blood sugar and have been dealing with that ever since. In college, I realized I had a problem by the time my obsession morphed into binging then puking. The disordered relationship I had with food (diagnosed as ED-NOS and later told sounded like OCD instead of an actual eating disorder) only ended when I had my first daughter. I made myself quit and deal with the anxiety because I didn’t want my daughter to grow up seeing her mom starve herself.

When I was little, I was told to not touch the stove- it would be hot. Needless to say, I burnt my hand but another time, I touched it and it was cold. I started testing to see whether it would be hot or cold each time I passed and before long, it was a compulsion. That compulsion/impulse happened every time I walked past an oven from the time I was around 7 or 8 until recently. Even when I was walking through an oven display at a place like Lowes (that’s always fun- tapping every stove I walk past in Lowes)

All those, along with having to bite my nails down until they are perfect, having to delete the whole sentence if I notice a typo and getting a headache when I read the misuse of “they’re, there and their,” were things I always considered quirks. That is, until it got really bad. I started getting obsessive thoughts- intrusive thoughts I could not get out of my mind. My oldest was born 3 months early, 1lb 11.5ozs and 13 inches long. She was very sick, long NICU stay and came home on oxygen. When she was 15 months, I got pregnant with her little sister. This baby didn’t live (she had a condition called Anencephaly) and that was when the OCD symptoms got bad. I got to the point I was afraid of carrying my daughter around because I’d get the image of her oxygen mask (cannula) falling off or dropping her down the stairs.

I started grief counseling through a program we had for my older daughter, mentioned the stories from when I was growing up and she told me I had OCD.

I started studying OCD and it fit perfect- it was like the puzzle pieces fell into place and it gave me such relief. She gave me a piece of advice I still use- to sit back when I have thoughts and ask myself “is this how a normal person would react?”

It has helped me through a lot, but I have had to go to normal people from time to time because, let’s be real, when you have a disorder like OCD- you do not know what normal is.

I have been reading a lot about the condition and I have been doing my best to ignore compulsions, ride out the anxiety and see that nothing horrible is happening. It gets annoying when OCD becomes my focus of obsession and when ignoring compulsions becomes a compulsion itself, but I am getting better with it.

I’ll post more on other types of OCD I have personally dealt with later, but since my diagnosis and starting to learn how to handle it, I have been trying to spread awareness of the real condition- not what everyone likes to joke about.

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Random thought 

When my oldest was little, she was easy to take care of. She was cautious, well behaved in public to the point where we got complemented on her behaviour. I stayed home for 4 years with her and hardly had to clean up messes from her. She also listened to “no” and quit the first time we asked. 

We decided to add a second thinking it would be the same story. The hurricane is now 2 and the complete opposite (not horrible behaved in public but she does enjoy screaming, yelling and talking to everyone. ) 

I’m worn out by noon typically with her. I love them, wouldn’t trade either and wouldn’t change either personality but I never knew 2 sisters could be so different and look so much alike. 

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Random thoughts

It’s been cold for the past week. Along with the cold, my arthritis has flared. I normally ignore the flare ups and go on with my life but my spine was inflamed and I pulled a muscle. Today is in the 50s-60s and it’s my first day back down to a pain level of about 4.

The only thing I changed was going from gluten free to a normal diet. My doctor told me to ignore the celiac panel they ran about 5 months ago when I first got ready to go gluten free because that test could have been wrong and to go back on the gf diet. I’m debating going back now vs waiting until after Christmas. I know eating a normal diet with wheat (the reason I went gf- it’s much easier to find specific gf foods than wheat free) is hurting (literally- bad cramping and other digestive issues) but Christmas cookies and all that.. Not sure why it’s an issue now when back in June when my daughter’s gastro specialist first recommended to me to try it for myself and all the way up to this month, it was easy to follow. I’ve only been studying it for 4 years and almost have shopping mastered. Dairy is easier to stay away from, for me. I don’t like milk, some yogurt and cheese is ok in small amounts and I’m not huge on ice cream.

I do know my IBS is almost fully gone (99%) when I cut both out fully. My doctor told me since gluten is the main trigger, it sounds like I’m gluten intolerant and not IBS. Only thing is stress and lack of sleep are also triggers and with a toddler and a child in school, you tend to end up lacking in sleep a lot.

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I started a new facebook page

I started a new facebook page mainly trying to spread some awareness as I learn about EDS and the other issues I’m learning I have. 

https://m.facebook.com/New-Age-Dream-Girl-704151713114993/

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How I found out about EDS.

From the time I was little, I always remember walking around with what felt like a bad sprained ankle. I was always twisting it, so I had no idea it wasn’t sprained. I also have hips rotated backwards, so my feet and knees stick out to the side. I could never run very well. I’d end up twisting my ankle. Even with all that, I never went to the er nor the doctor often so I didn’t think anything was wrong.

I also have always had a nervous habit of bending my pinky fingers sideways to my pointer and just holding them in that position, it was something to do with my hands (I have also had anxiety since I was very young) and I lived by the belief that everyone could do it. My thumb can lay flat against my wrist/arm and I can turn my feet backwards so they’re straight behind me. No one ever told me that (along with the aches and pains that went with being hyperflexible) was strange.

Fast forward, I just had my first baby. I developed severe pre eclampsia over the course of less than a week and had to have her at 28 weeks. We were in the NICU and while she was there, I welcomed every study they asked me to do. One was testing flexibility. That was when I first heard the phrase “hyper mobile” and scored almost the highest score you can get. It blew my mind because I thought you only were flexible if you could bend your pinky to the back of your hand (I can’t, mine goes sideways) and if you could touch your toes or the floor (my hip dysplasia along with arthritis makes it too painful). I started looking into it and found it was, in fact, odd.

Fast forward five years. Baby 1 is now 5 years old. We took her to a specialist due to very early onset scoliosis. I showed him my joints and he said it looks like Ehlers Danlos. I had my doctor confirm it a few days ago.

In a way, I’m glad I didn’t find out until after I had all 3 kids. I am really not sure if I would have chosen to have kids had I known about this (and others I’ve been diagnosed with that I’m going to go into in another post).

It feels almost selfish, although the specialist said my oldest doesn’t appear to have it- and I’ve had several professionals confirm there really isn’t a great test for hypermobility type EDS- it goes off appearance mostly. I mean, genetics are a crap shoot anyways but it feels like I put two kids on this planet to deal with (mostly mild- at times up to severe) pain for their lives.

The pain gets easy to manage. I wouldn’t know what to do if I woke up one day completely pain free (I’d love it, though). When you’re born a certain way, your body compensates and conditions itself. You adapt to chronic pain so you know nothing about normal. It still isn’t something I’d wish on my kids and I hope neither inherit it, my oldest’s specialist said she doesn’t appear to have it, but I’m watching my toddler’s feet. So far, they do seem to stick out and that seems to be one sign.